Information via LED on the smartphone: Archaeological Museum Hamburg presents exhibits in a new light

Pilot project FlowSign presented on 25th April 2019 in the Bischofsturm

Discovering, experiencing and understanding archaeology is the motto of the Archaeological Museum Hamburg. To make this even easier and more intuitive for the visitors, the museum is now focusing on “intelligent light”. In cooperation with the technology company Fujitsu, the exhibitions will provide supplementary information on the presented objects for mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. The key to this technology is called FlowSign and is now being used for the first time in Europe – in the branch office of the Archaeological Museum Hamburg, the Bischofsturm. The innovative FlowSign technology will expand the information available to visitors to the Archaeological Museum Hamburg in the future. On 25th April, the pilot project FlowSign was presented in the Bischofsturm, a branch office of the Museum at the Domplatz. Prof. Dr. Rainer-Maria Weiss, Director of the Archaeological Museum Hamburg, together with Andreas Hennig, Director of Public Sector VC Nord at Fujitsu and Georg Nass, Head of Digital Transformation Public Sector at Fujitsu, explained the new technology.

 

Digital information in the beam of light

With FlowSign it is possible to combine digital information with exhibition objects, such as the faithful reproduction of the 1000-year-old Bells of the Hamburg Dom (i.e. cathedral), which can be seen in the exhibition of the Bischofsturm. The link works with “intelligent light”: The FlowSign system has an LED light source that illuminates an exhibit. The beam of light contains digital information about the exhibit in question, similar to a QR code. For the human eye, this data is invisible.

 

An app makes the data visible

Visitors can view the extra information on their mobile device through the camera, as well as an app available for Android and iOS mobile operating systems. The use is simple: the visitor uses the camera of his mobile device to scan the illuminated object and thus receives the information associated with this object. To do this, the camera must be pointed at the illuminated object, and then the code is already recognized by the device. The information associated with the code is displayed directly on the mobile system’s display and can be retrieved.

 

Information is provided as text, image, video and in 360° views

With Fujitsu FlowSign, the Archaeological Museum Hamburg can provide its visitors with extended information about its treasures in various ways, for example as text or in the form of pictures and videos. Even 360° views of objects can be offered.