Coins are not only current and early money, they also carried culture for over 2,500 years. During the Renaissance they were collected as pieces of art and examined scientifically by various disciplines.

The KENOM project (Kooperative Erschließung und Nutzung der Objektdaten von Münzsammlungen) was developed 2012 during a project sponsored by the DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) and runs now continuously, aided by the VZG (Verbundzentrale des Gemeinsamen Bibliotheksverbundes). It combines classic coin cabinets as well as numismatic special collections like the ones in museums or archaeological state offices.

The Archaeological Museum Hamburg’s coin collection is one of the biggest of Hamburg’s museums, counting 25,000 objects. Most of them are medieval so-called hoard finds that were excavated by the museum’s archaeologists. Another big part consists of coins belonging to city history. These show the development of Harburg from a ducal fortification to an industrial city.

The Archaeological Museum started digitalizing its collection in 2007. Since 2014 it uses the KENOM infrastructure to collect and present its inventory. The museum shows 3,000 medieval coins on the portal.

Kenom Online Coin Collection